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HIV/AIDS

Is HIV still an epidemic issue? Yes, HIV/AIDS awareness and education still matters. Although, much triumph has occurred in HIV research and medicine over the years, the work is not yet done. African American women are still 3x more likely to receive a new HIV diagnosis.

In 2016, 4,560 Black women were diagnosed with HIV, representing 61% of HIV diagnoses among all women in the United States that year.

In 2016, 4,560 Black women were diagnosed with HIV, representing 61% of HIV diagnoses among all women in the United States that year.

In 2016, 4,560 Black women were diagnosed with HIV, representing 61% of HIV diagnoses among all women in the United States that year. These statistics are alarming and high compared to women of other races/ethnicities. Learn more about HIV→

What is HIV?

HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Its an infection that affects humans only and attacks the immune system, thus causing the immune system not to work effectively thus performing below standards. The HIV virus attacks the immune system CD4 cells (T cell) which are white blood cells that fight off bacteria and infections from the body. HIV is the virus that can lead to acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, or AIDS, if not treated. Find a testing location near you→

Let's Talk about PrEP.

There is a new era of HIV/AIDS—current reports showcase stability statistics and decline. Benefits to new treatment options such a PrEP. PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. It’s a safety contraceptive purposed to provide additional protection to women before exposure to a disease. It’s greatly beneficial in protecting from HIV transmission. Learn more about PrEP